Obituary, George Marshall Freck

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Marlton – George Marshall Freck died peacefully on November 30, 2021 surrounded by his loving family.

George was born on July 14, 1927 in Jacksonville, Florida to George and Isabelle (Hanna) Freek. George spent his childhood growing up on the banks of the Mississippi River in Cordova, Illinois, where he developed his love of the outdoors. From there, he proudly joined the US Navy to serve during World War II in the Pacific from 8-14-1944 to 06-06-1946. He later re-enlisted to serve during the Korean War from 09-21-1950 to 06-01-1952. He met and married his bride, Rosemarie (Famiglietti) Freck in Brooklyn, NY. He was a devoted husband for 55 years until she died in 2003. They loved and cherished their three incredible children, Katherine Ann (Ralph) Gregory, Robert (Michele) Freck and George (Joan) Freck. He was predeceased by his son, George, in 1993. George was admired and adored by his grandchildren, Georgette Mastrogianni, Allison Bucks, Jennifer (Jeffrey) Negro, Rachel (Roberto) Freck-Morales, Anthony Freck, Paul Freck and Michael (Gina) Freck. He left behind eleven great-grandchildren, Olivia, Francesca, Stefania, John, James, Lola, Layla, Natalie, Ethan, Gregory, and Daniel who all reveled in the amazing stories of his life. George had an absolute love for the outdoors and wildlife; he was an avid fisherman who found his peace on the water, a trait passed down to and shared with his youngest son. George had an insatiable thirst for knowledge, he was always reading, questioning and researching, a trait passed down to and shared with his two older children. It could be argued George’s favorite thing to do was listen to, watch or attend NY Yankee games, a trait he passed down to and shared with most of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. George will forever be missed by his family. Visitation will be held on Friday, December 3, 2021 from 2-4 & 7-9 pm at John F. Pfleger Funeral Home, 115 Tindall Rd., Middletown. A prayer service will be held during the visitation. Burial will be held on Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 11:30 am at Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY

In lieu of flowers contributions can be made in George’s name to Wounded Warrior Project at woundedwarriorproject.org/donate or the Audubon Society at audubon.org.

Posted online on December 01, 2021

Published in Asbury Park Press

https://www.app.com/obituaries/asb273261

2022 USS Franklin Reunion update!

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Hi USS Franklin Family-

Hosts Kent and Amy Hathaway have reached out with the date for the 2022 reunion and some initial information to share.

Dates: July 19, 20, 21, 22 (2022)

Location: The Inn on Barons Creek, Fredericksburg, Texas

Note: Rooms will be also available the 2 days prior to the reunion (July 17 & 18) if planning to arrive early.

This post will be updated as more information becomes available.

SAVE THE DATE, more details to follow soon…

Obituary, Gilbert “Gene” Eugene Baca

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Gilbert Eugene Baca “Gene” left us on November 18, 2021 after a long, satisfying and full life of 94 years and 7 months. He was preceded in death by his parents Thomas Montoya Baca and Mary Isabel “May” McAuley Baca and three brothers, Ernest Mitchell, Robert Thomas “Bobby “and a stillborn brother. He is survived by his wife of 62 years Bonnie Baca, a sister-in-law Marion Baca, and several nieces and nephews.

He was born April 19, 1927 in the house his grandfather, A.B. Baca, Sr. built in 1910 in Socorro, NM. His great uncle, Elfego Baca, of NM fame was the youngest brother of A.B., Sr. Gilbert attended school in Socorro until his senior year of high school when his family moved to San Pedro, California, where he graduated from high school at the age of 16. Upon graduation Gilbert asked the US Post Office if they could hire him for any type of work, thinking he could load packages or other chores since he knew he was too young to work as a federal employee. However, the post office was desperate for help since most able-bodied men were fighting in WWII, so he was given a uniform and a sack of mail and embarked on what became a life-long postal career. Just barely 18 years old he joined the Navy serving on three carriers: the USS Cowpens in Pearl Harbor, where he saw action in the Pacific, the USS Kitty Hawk and finally the USS Franklin CV-13, while under repairs in NYC, Brooklyn naval yard where he worked in the mail room returning letters after having to stamp them KIA and MIA. After discharge as Seaman 1st Class K Division, he returned to San Pedro continuing his career at the US Post Office, this time as a full-fledged federal civil servant. He worked as a letter carrier, supervisor, and finally as manager of the West Los Angeles Post Office before retirement. He then worked for three plus years for the City of Los Angeles as a golf starter which he loved since he was an avid golfer and could play golf at any Los Angeles Golf Course at any time.

In 1989 he and Bonnie moved to Rio Rancho, NM where Gil enjoyed life immensely, playing golf, enjoying lots of friends, enjoying watching their beloved USC Trojan college football games which they held season tickets for many years. They enjoyed travelling extensively and for the past fifteen plus years attending their yearly USS Franklin reunions with all of their “Franklin Family”. He was a member of the American Legion and a life-long member of the VFW. Gil lived a long happy life filled to the brim.

His viewing and visitation service will be at 11:00 am on December 15, 2021, at Daniels Funeral Home, 4310 Sara Road, SE, Rio Rancho followed by internment at 2:15 pm at the Santa Fe National Cemetery, 501 Guadalupe St., Santa Fe, NM

Originally posted here: https://www.danielsfuneral.com/obituary/GilbertGene-Baca

Hanging on to Faith Alone.

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HANGING ON TO FAITH ALONE

George Fain Black

 

Having scarcely been more than fifty miles from home in my life, I had decided on my 18th birthday to join the Navy. I rode a bus for 90 miles to Lubbock, Texas, where as a selective volunteer, I was sent to Naval Boot Training at Camp Wallace near Galveston. After “boots,” I traveled on a troop train to radio school at Naval Armory in Indianapolis, and graduated as a radioman striker in December 1944. I arrived at a receiving ship near San Jose, California, and in less than 2 weeks, was on a bus in search of my ship.  I clearly remember the bus turning a corner at dockside at Alameda, and there loomed the most awesome thing I had ever seen in my life—the attack aircraft carrier named USS Franklin. The sea detail had already been set, and lines were attached to the gangway to pull it aboard just minutes after our party had boarded. I had never before seen a ship, or the sea.

 

While awaiting billeting assignment, my group was allowed to witness our departure under the Golden Gate, and saw it finally disappear into the haze. I had difficulty in acclimating to shipboard life, as I was in a group of 10 who did not even have a bunk, locker, or compartment assigned; we had to live, even off duty, in the mess hall, and sleep in our hammocks, as best as we’ could, when it did not conflict with mess meals or the early rising Airedales.  After we let Ulithi atoll, the mess hall was used as a bomb assembly area when not used for mess. I usually swung my hammock near the bomb elevator, and on one occasion, was roused out of my hammock from a deep exhaustive sleep only to straddle a 500-pound bomb parked directly under me. My watch was important. I was on what was called “Jump Fox,” which was NSS Pearl Harbor and CINCPAC. Should the main operator miss reception of the Morse-coded messages, then, as the “back up,” I was expected to receive it. As the “flag” was aboard, anything that came for “Big Ben” was important.

 

Recalling, the communications K division went into battle conditions on March 15, we shifted to two battle watches: starboard and port, and we stayed at our radio positions for 8 hours. My first test as an operator receiver came on the 16th, with our call sign direct from Admiral Nimitz H.Q. It was a long coded message; both the operator and I got it okay. A few hours later, after decoding and delivery, I Was shown the message copy and it said, “Lucky Day March 17.” We guessed that our sealed orders authorized our attack to commence on that date, and we turned out to be correct. Before we could be relieved from watch, we went into battle stations; so we remained on watch all through the 17th and into the l8th. Several attempts were made to relieve us for mess and rest, but each time was thwarted by battle conditions with bogeys on the screen. I recall going through the night of the l8th-l9th still at watch on the radios… very hungry, and tired. We had plenty of java and that was it. Suddenly, one of the communications officers, an Ensign, burst into the radio shack and announced our relief was just behind. We were to go on the double before chow call and eat ahead of everyone else; we had to get mess over within 5 minutes and report to Radio 2 on the fantail. Tired and hungry, I jumped and handed the earphones to my relief (I never saw him again as he was killed there), and followed my watch leader, First Class R/M Walter Bigusiak, down the ladders to mess.

 

The first bomb exploded, just as l seated and started scooping in chow. The blast flung me clear across the compartment into a corner. I struck a stack of sea bags and hammocks, one being my own, which cushioned the impact.  Others seated at the same mess table were not so lucky. Managing to get to my feet as a few others were doing the same, I noticed everyone’s face was sooty black from the burnt powder of the blast. Some hurried to go aft, some forward. Later, I learned that hardly anyone made it out. We had been ordered to Radio 2 on the starboard fantail, and tried to go that way. We were following Bigusiak, so we went port to a ladder that led up to the hanger deck. Thirteen men got into a small crew compartment under the hangar deck, just before the lights went out. A few minutes later, the telephone went out. The heat from above was becoming intolerable. I grabbed a towel from a bunk, wet it in a scuttlebutt, and tied the wet towel over my face to breathe, and then crawled into a bunk.  The explosions came closer and knocked down anyone standing. A cook grabbed the hatch wheel atop the ladder, and burned his hands.  After what seemed an eternity and another close explosion, salt water started pouring in from above, cooling off the hatch, and the cook was able to turn the wheel. By this time, we were out of air and in a starboard list. A burned out plane slid away from over the hatch and we now had a way to climb out onto the hangar deck. A rocket had blown a leak in a salt water line, and the pouring water put out the fire just over us.

 

By my own count, 11 preceded me up the ladder. A man wearing a gas mask grabbed me as number 12 and pushed me ahead of him. Had he not done this, I would not have made it, as I was now strangling. He was last out and number 13. We were nearly overcome with smoke and lack of oxygen.

 

The hangar deck was an unbelievable mass of wreckage and fire. A burning fighter plane’s wing guns spit bullets just above our heads, and then a blast spun it around in another direction. The deck was full of bomb holes, and we followed our only light to starboard. There was carnage everywhere. We met not a living soul on the hangar deck. Reaching a gun mount, we saw no way out in any direction but the sea. No rats, no floats, no life buoys, no life jackets among any of us; just steel helmets. Burning aviation gasoline started pouring over the side and making its way aft toward us. The decision was go or stay; an individual choice. Bigusiak a non-swimmer, was the only one to stay. We jumped overboard in groups of three, all 12 of us. I didn’t know the other two who jumped with me, but for a while we managed to stay together. Until they drowned, I tried to hold the other two up. Both were wounded, and just gave up. A “can” went by at full speed and threw a life preserver to us, but I was too exhausted to swim to it. I was managing to stay afloat by trapping air in my shirt. After 55 years of wondering, I still have not clearly established the time frame. It must have been hours.

 

I could tell the light was getting dim when a fighter roared over me just above the water. I thought perhaps I was going to get strafed, but it turned out to be one of ours, and he was leading a “can” to me. Some guy actually roped me first-try with a loop, and I was pulled into a cargo net. I had noticed I had drifted into land swells, and I was having difficulty keeping afloat. I suppose not much time was left for me. Just in time, the USS Hunt had saved me. Hours later, when I awoke, and days later, when I could walk, I looked all over the ship for those 12 guys from the Franklin who took to the sea with me, but none were aboard. Later I learned that Bigusiak, who had apparently stayed with the ship to his end, was listed as M.I.A.

 

Going from bunk to bunk and looking at all the faces, and asking around on the Hunt, I realized that of the my group of Franklin crewmen, 13 in all, one had died on the hangar deck, and of the 12 men who had gone into the sea together, I alone, was rescued.

It is a short journey of the sweet innocence of a youth, who in nine short months sailed into harm’s way to be a part of the carnage.

 

It is real FAITH when that is all you have to hang onto.

When thou passest through the waters, 1 will be with

thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee.

When thou walkest through the rivers, thou shalt not be

burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee.

 

Isaiah 43:2

 

Tips on researching the USS Franklin, CV-13

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There have been several inquiries regarding how to best research information on a crew member through the Franklin social media channels. These are the best online resources to help start your search that I have found. Please feel free to send suggestions to franklin@ussfranklin.org. I will try to keep this list updated.

Facebook: The USS Franklin Museum Association maintains a group called Survivors, Family, and Friends of the USS Franklin CV-13, click here for access: https://www.facebook.com/groups/107402169285997/?ref=bookmarks

There are also other USS Franklin groups as well as many World War II groups to explore.
Facebook is the top recommended resource for sharing USS Franklin information as many relatives of crew members regularly visit and contribute to these pages.

www.USSFranklin.org website: This is the main website for the USS Franklin CV-13 Museum Association. The content found on this website includes the bi-annual Newsletter, Reunion information, and Obituaries. Inquiries can be sent to franklin@ussfranklin.org, the main website email address.

USS Franklin Cruise Book, Big Ben the Flat Top: For more information, click below.
www.ussfranklin.org/?p=901

USS Franklin Muster Rolls. http://www.ussfranklin.org/?p=1306 The Muster Rolls are a large collection of PDF files available for download. These documents were kept by the Navy to record who was aboard the ship at all times.

www.Ancestry.com: This is a pay website, but we have found there to be a lot of detailed information, including muster rolls and draft cards. If you are looking to research a specific individual, this might be a great resource.

USS Franklin Muster Roll

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USS Franklin Muster Roll H Selection 1/31/1944

For USS Franklin researchers, I have obtained a copy of the USS Franklin muster roll copied from microfilm records of the US Navy.  This muster roll contains records of the ships company as the sailors moved onto and off of the ship.  This is not a complete account of all the ships transfers.  Specifically, this does not include information on the Marine and Air groups on board the Franklin.  The file is very large- at 2GB in size and may take some time to download from google drive.  You must “Unzip” the file to reveal all of the individual pages in .jpg picture format.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzBtohmaZ_nSbFVzM0ZRNHNoSTA/view?usp=sharing&resourcekey=0-YrFQ3pMyApJqulWaJJT9xQ

This is very similar if not the same information available at www.ancestry.com.

Inscribed bricks offered at the USS Franklin Memorial in Stuart Florida

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You may recall the USS Franklin’s own Sam Rhodes efforts to establish a USS Franklin Memorial in Stuart Florida published in an article on this site in November 2013.  See the article below.

USS Franklin plaques to be dedicated in Memorial Park in Stuart Florida on Veterans Day.

Mr. Ed Maxwell of the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 1041 in Stuart Florida reports that their Memorial Brick Program is open to any and all veterans and is installing customized bricks in the Stuart Veterans Memorial Park.  Bricks can be customized for $25 and $75 dollars.  Make sure you mention your USS Franklin connection so the bricks can be located accordingly in the park.  Click the image of the brick below for an application.

Harry Smeltzer Brick USS Franklin Memorial Stuart Florida

https://ussfranklin310144520.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/bricks.pdf

You can also get a brick application at the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 1041 website here:

http://www.vva1041.org/#!about2/c1et

 

Memorial Service, Sunday Morning 25 March 1945

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70 Years ago, on Sunday Morning 25 March 1945, in the aftermath of the USS Franklin Bombing, Protestant Chaplain G. Weldon Gatlin delivered the sermon below at a memorial service for the fallen crew aboard the USS Franklin.

Franklin Memorial Service Page 1

Franklin Memorial Service Page 1

Please click the image above to access the 4 page document. The PDF Document is approximately 5MB so it may take a minute to download.

Obituary, Edward Everett Wilkinson Jr.

Edward Everett Wilkinson Jr.

Cincinnati – Wilkinson, Edward Everett Jr. It is with great sadness, the family of Edward E. Wilkinson Jr. announces his passing on Saturday, February 13, 2021 at the age of 93 years. ‘Ed’ as he was known by to his friends and family, was preceded in death by his wife of 59 years, Zona Wilkinson (nee Strietelmeier), and survived by his daughters Dawn A. Wilkinson, son-in-law Warren S. Jaffe; Holly R. Wilkinson, son-in-law Christian Burns and grandson Everett E. Burns. Ed, born to Ellen Wilkinson (nee Lipscomb) and Edward E. Wilkinson, and elder brother to James Wilkinson, grew up in the Village of Mariemont, Ohio. Ed’s love of sports, cars, and design were themes that ran throughout his life. At 17, he proudly served his country in WWII as a Grumman Avenger Torpedo Bomber pilot aboard the USS Franklin until it was decommissioned in 1945. Upon returning from the War, he completed his high school education at Cincinnati Country Day where he was awarded best all-around athlete his Senior year while also attaining the rank of Eagle Scout. After completing the Fall season at Ohio State on a Football Scholarship, he transferred to Miami University (Oxford Ohio), playing four years of Varsity baseball with his brother, Jim. In 1950, he played semi-pro ball for the Boston Red Sox, before returning to Miami to complete his Masters in Architecture. Ed was also a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Ed’s love of speed, mechanics, and design were the perfect combination for motorsport. In 1955, he drove on the Maserati Racing Team. He designed the family’s Mid-Century Modern home where he and his wife, Zona, lived for 50 plus years. Ed remained an avid athlete throughout his life embracing golf, bowling, slow-pitch softball, and skiing. Additionally, he was an avid reader who enjoyed history, working puzzles, drawing, and home improvement projects. There really was nothing he couldn’t draw, design, or fix. For many years, Ed was an active member of the Clovernook Christian Church serving as a Deacon and on the Board of Trustees. He also participated in community service as a member of the Kiwanis Club. Ed spent 30 plus years with Armco Steel Corporation, as the Marketing Director for their New Materials Division. Upon retirement, he and Zona traveled the world, visiting six of the seven continents. Daddy, we love you and already miss your steady council, dry wit, and creative spirit but we are happy for you. Now, you are with Mom, Uncle Jim, Granny and your Dad. You can see again and oh, the reunion you must be having – truly your own ‘Field of Dreams’ and hitting it out of the park. We love you Daddy. In respect to Covid-19 concerns and protocols, the family had a private service on Monday, February 22, 2021 at the Spring Grove Funeral Home 4389 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, OH. The burial followed services at the funeral home at Spring Grove Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to GUIDE DOGS FOR THE BLIND INC

To Plant Memorial Trees in memory, please visit our Sympathy Store.Published in The Cincinnati Enquirer from Feb. 22 to Feb. 23, 2021.

Obituary, Wilfred “Norm” Cadieux

Wilfred “Norm” Cadieux

Wilfred “Norm” Cadieux, 95, a resident of Port Charlotte, Florida, passed away peacefully on Feb. 27, 2021, at Englewood Community Hospital in Englewood, Florida.

Born in Fall River, Massachusetts, he was the son of the late Wilfred and Mabel (Gaboury) Cadieux. Norm was a US Navy Veteran of World War II having served in the Navy on the U.S.S. FRANKLIN. He was proud of his service to his country and often attended FRANKLIN reunions.

Prior to retiring, Norm worked as a Master Mechanic at Hascon Industries in Taunton. Soon after his retirement, Norm and his wife moved to Tiverton, Rhode Island, where they owned a house on Fogland Beach. Norm was very active in beach life and loved his water sports. He was an avid cyclist and on more than one occasion participated in the Century Race. In the late 1990s, Norm and Irene moved to Port Charlotte, Florida, where he embraced his new community making lots of new friends. He truly enjoyed his time in Florida where he could take long trips exploring on his bicycle all year round. He continued his bike rides until shortly before his death. He loved playing in his yard: mowing, gardening, and feeding his birds; visiting his neighbors on his tractor; and spending lots of time in his hobby room. Norm will be missed by all.

Norm is survived by his wife of 70 years, Irene Costa Cadieux, and their three children; his daughter Patricia Walker and her husband Kenneth, his son Michael Cadieux and his wife Tracy, and his daughter Renie Hamman and her husband Jim; five grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren; a sister, Jeannette, and many nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his other six siblings.

A family memorial service will be held in Massachusetts this summer.

Donations in Norm’s name can be made to: The Naval Institute Foundation, 291 Wood Road, Beach Hall, Annapolis, MD 21402 / https://www.usni.org/donate or to the National or a State Audubon Society.

Friends may visit online at http://www.robersonfh.com to extend condolences to the family. Arrangements are by Roberson Funeral Homes & Crematory, Port Charlotte Chapel.

Obituary, George W. Bowen

Psalm 37:37

Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright,

for the end of that man is peace.

When George was confirmed at age 13, in April 1938, the pastor of Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in Floral Park, NY prophetically chose this verse to represent the young man pictured above. It was most appropriate, for indeed, he did become an upright, good man.

George W. Bowen, age 96, resident of The Bickford Senior Living Community, Virginia Beach, VA died on March 30, 2021. George was born September 24, 1924 in Floral Park, NY to William and Anna Bowen.

To his father’s dismay, in 1943, at age 19, George enlisted in the United States Navy. He saw service aboard the heavy aircraft carrier USS Franklin in the Pacific as an Aviation Electrician Mate 3/C. He received a Purple Heart for injuries sustained in a Kamikaze attack off Kyushu, Japan in March 1945.

George married the former Helen Lizzette Bloechle, in June 1950, at Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in Floral Park, NY. For nearly 40 years they resided in Floral Park, NY before moving to Garden City, NY where they resided for another 25 years.

He received a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering in 1947 from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and a Master of Industrial Engineering in 1951 from New York University.

George Bowen worked for Liberty Mutual Insurance Company for 18 years as Director of Materials Handling. A 1961 trade magazine article described him as the focal person for material handling safety as he worked with Liberty’s 350 field engineers and the safety departments of the company’s policyholders.

When he left Liberty Mutual, and began working for the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) from 1967 to 1996, he became a force for international standardization of material handling and manufacturing, and in particular the use of the intermodal shipping container. In 1967, the use of the international cargo shipping container was still in its nascent period. Standardization of the container’s size had not been achieved and its use had not yet gained worldwide acceptance. Without an international size standard, the shipping container’s movement would be hindered in its transfer from land to sea to air, negating its benefits. George worked to secure international acceptance of the standardized shipping container. To this end, George served as the Secretariat of International Trade Standardization meetings around the world. At his retirement, at age 72, the following sentiments were shared:

The responsibilities of an ISO International Technical Committee Secretariat are awesome and at time require a good bit of tightrope walking. The secretariat must serve the best interests of international standardization and faithfully carry out the letter and intent of ISO (International Standards Organization) procedures. At the same time there is necessarily considerable national interest involved which must also receive proper recognition. It is a wonder that any secretariat can do as well as GWB. His unusual ability to knife through triviality and summarize agreements in resolution format cut off hours of palaver. He was able to capture the fine points of agreement, with USA interests in mind. We will miss your experience and wise council and your ability to get us through the tough battles with few to no scars.

We can look at the millions of containers moving in every country of the world and this is attributable to the good job you did. That is quite a feather in your cap and one you should take real pride in.

I got to know George as the quiet observant guy at the end of the table who heard everything and said almost nothing. He resolved any questions of ANSI protocol as soon as they arose with about six words. No one asked why or said explain that. No matter how hectic, argumentative and factional the meeting became and they often did, George was the rock and anchor.

He was an active leader in professional organizations through out his career: American Society of Mechanical Engineers – Chairman of Safety Division Executive Committee, American Material Handling Society – President New York Chapter, International Material Management Society – President New York Chapter, and New York & Massachusetts Engineering Societies – Registered Professional Engineer.

After retirement George was involved with the Long Island Early Fliers Club, the Long Island Air& Space Museum, the Nassau County Office for the Physically Challenged, the Long Island Children’s Museum, and both the Garden City, NY and Floral Park, NY Historical Societies.

George was predeceased in 2018 by his spouse of 68 years, Helen Lizzette Bowen. He is survived by his children Janet Blohm (James), Thomas Bowen (Amy), his grandchildren Lizette Reed (Ryan), Claire Blohm – Warshauer (Alex), Dustin Bowen, and his great -grandchildren June and Walden Reed.

A memorial service will be celebrated at a later date in New York, followed by burial at Greenfield Cemetery in Uniondale, NY. Hollomon-Brown Funeral Home, Princess Anne Chapel is handling arrangements.

To Plant Memorial Trees in memory, please visit our Sympathy Store.

Published in The Virginian-Pilot from Apr. 6 to Apr. 7, 2021.

Obituary, Frank Tilton Chase Jr

Frank T. Chase, Jr.
Seabrook – Frank Tilton Chase Jr., passed away at the age of 95 on April 16, 2021 after a period of failing health. Frank was surrounded by loved ones during his final hours. He was the son of Frank Sr. and Carrie (Janvrin) Chase and was a lifelong resident of Seabrook.
He proudly chose to serve his country as a Navy seaman in WWII. Frank served on the USS Franklin (CV-13) aircraft carrier in multiple battles throughout the Pacific, and was onboard when it was hit by bombs and kamikaze planes costing the ship over 700 of its’ crew. For his actions during this final battle of the ship, he was awarded the Bronze Star.
Frank was a merchant marine after the war, eventually working for over 20 years at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. He was a commercial fisherman during most of his life, having caught his last Bluefin tuna weighing 300 lbs. at the age of 91.
In addition to fishing, Frank enjoyed hunting, spending time outfitting his boats, and gatherings with his family. One of Franks’ fondest memories was travelling to the WWII memorial in Washington D.C. on an Honor Flight with his grandson Frank whom he had a very special relationship. He was one of the longest standing members of the Raymond E. Walton American Legion Post #70.
Frank was predeceased in 2012 by his beloved wife of 62 years Gloria (Dow) Chase, and is survived by his three children and their spouses; Peggy and her husband Eugene Welch and Frank W. and his wife Dianne Chase both of Seabrook, Charlotte and her husband Ralph Tapia of Wakefield NH, and 6 grandchildren, Eugene Welch, Michael Welch, Tia Watts, Traci Dorman, Frank Chase and Shelly Bitomske, 12 great grandchildren, his brother Francis Chase, his sisters Patricia Locke, Marlene Greenwood and Pamela Fryklund, several nieces and nephews.
In addition to his wife and parents Frank was predeceased by four siblings; Elsie Chase, Bessie Anchors, Annie Chase and Donald Chase.
Visiting hours will be from 2:30 – 4:30 P.M. Saturday, April 24, 2021 at the Remick & Gendron Funeral Home-Crematory, 811 Lafayette Road, Hampton. Services will be private. A graveside memorial will be held at a later date. Donations may be made to the National Kidney Foundation, 30 East 33rd Street, New York, NY 10016 or the charity of your choice. Please visit http://www.RemickGendron.com to view Franks’ memorial website, sign his tribute wall or for directions.

To Plant Memorial Trees in memory, please visit our Sympathy Store.
Published in Seacoastonline.com from Apr. 19 to Apr. 23, 2021.

Obituary, Hollbrook R. Davis

OSTERVILLE – February 1, 2021, Hollbrook R. Davis died peacefully on Monday, February 1, 2021. He and his family had lived and maintained a home in Osterville since 1930.

He attended school in Pittsburgh, PA where he was born in 1921. After his family moved to Osterville, he graduated from the Osterville Primary School. Thereafter, he attended private schools in Switzerland and Milton, MA. He graduated from Harvard College after the War, with the Class of ’46.

During the War, he volunteered with the American Field Service and was an ambulance driver with the British 8th Army in Africa. He was present when the Germans and Italians were defeated in Tunisia in May of 1943. When he returned to the United States, he joined the Navy and served on the Aircraft Carrier U.S.S. Franklin in the far Pacific where he was awarded the Silver Star Medal in 1945.

From 1947 until 1976 he was employed by a large international aluminum company in several capacities in Canada, the United States and in Switzerland.

While living in Canada, he was elected Chairman of the Executive Board of the YMCA of Canada, and as such, visited local Y’s from Coast to Coast. Although he traveled extensively during his business career he always maintained his primary residence in Osterville. He was the proprietor of Osterville House & Garden from 1974 to 2001.

He was pre-deceased by his wife of 70 years, Sarah Maynard Davis and is survived by his sons Maynard K. Davis and Caleb N. Davis and his daughter Sarah H. Davis, seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

For online condolences, please visit http://www.doanebealameshyannis.com.

Doane, Beal & Ames Funeral Home

508-775-0684

Published on February 06, 2021

USS Franklin Reunion June 8-11 2021 Registration

Hello Franklin Family,

We are pleased to be able to finally reschedule our Pensacola reunion.  Based on the responses from our survey most people were in favor of changing to Tuesday-Friday to hopefully see the Blue Angels.  They are scheduled to practice on June 9th.  

Finding a hotel in Pensacola to meet our needs at a reasonable price has been a huge challenge.  After much consideration we have switched to the newly renovated Holiday Inn located at 7813 N. Davis Highway.  It is 2 miles from the airport and has complimentary parking but no shuttle.  Our room rate is $129 which does include breakfast.  This rate will be honored for 2 days before the reunion.  The rate for Friday or Saturday (before or after the reunion) is $159.  To book your room please call the hotel at 850-472-1400.  Or you can click this link: 
https://www.holidayinn.com/redirect?path=hd&brandCode=HI&localeCode=en&regionCode=1&hotelCode=pnsnd&_PMID=99801505&GPC=USF&cn=no&viewfullsite=true

*The link will only book rooms for 6/6-6/11 at the $129 rate.  If you want to add any weekend nights please call LeAnn Collins at 850-382-8659.  Our block of 30 rooms will be held until May 8th and then the rooms will be released.  Please do not delay booking your room as it can always be cancelled.  

The reunion will begin Tuesday June 8th with Registration at 4pm.  There will be a 5pm Board meeting.

On June 9th we will board out trolleys (Big Thanks again to Tom at Beach Bum Trolley!!) and depart for the National Aviation Museum.  

***EVERYONE 16 AND OLDER WILL NEED A VALID PICTURE ID TO ENTER THE MUSEUM!!!

At the museum we will have our Memorial Ceremony, watch an IMAX movie, see the Blue Angels practice, eat lunch at the Cubi Bar Cafe and tour the museum.  

That evening, join us in the hospitality room for some entertainment and refreshments.

On June 10th we will have the general meeting in the morning and the dinner dance in the evening.

June 11th we will have the 8 o’clock Report in the morning before saying our farewells.

The dinner entree selections for Saturday are as follows:

Beef   London Broil: marinated char grilled flank steak, thinly sliced topped with a mushroom and cabernet wine sauce.

Chicken   Chicken Riesling:  sauteed chicken breast with fresh mushrooms and a reisling wine sauce.

Fish   Shrimp Scampi: Jumbo shrimp sauteed in butter and garlic with mushrooms, tomato, parsley, scallions, lemon and white wine sauce.  Served over pasta with parmesan cheese.

Vegetarian:  Same as the fish entree but without the shrimp.

We decided to try something different with the registrations this year.  Instead of everyone mailing them in I created a Google Form.  So our preference is to have you fill out the form online and submit it back to us.  It is very easy!  We would also prefer if you could send the registration fee through Zelle, PayPal or Venmo.  

The reunion fee is $155.  Children 12 and under $120.

Please fill out the online registration at the link below or print it out and send it in:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe2CvOewJtbgsp69_pZ0iYvTMKI3goXiOXdS7dlQZTlzFyEjg/viewform?vc=0&c=0&w=1&flr=0


For those of you that normally receive a paper Newsletter, we will send you a paper Registration.   


If you are unable to do the form or payment that way please print out the form and mail it to: 

April Homko

℅ Pensacola Reunion

2210 Gray Hawk Dr.

Plainfield, IL 60586-6565

*** If mailing a check please still make it out to:

USS Franklin Reunion 2020

That is the name on the bank account.  So, please use 2020!

Once I receive your registration and payment I will send you a confirmation email that it is complete!

Registration deadline is May 8th!

If you have any questions please text, call or email April at

815-685-9298 or aprilhomko@gmail.com

We hope to see you in June!

Obituary, Curtis J. Rushing

Curtis J. Rushing 1926 – 2021
Springfield, IL—Curtis J. Rushing, 94, of Springfield, died at 5:25 am, Sunday, January 10, 2021 at his home. He was born August 28, 1926 in West Frankfort, IL to Dolph Rushing and Zella (Crain) Rushing, and they preceded him in death. He married Joyce M. Baker on June 1, 1952, and she survives.
He is also survived by three sons: Brad (Robin) Rushing, James W. (Debbie) Rushing, Todd B. (Krista) Rushing, six grandchildren: Eric Rushing, Kelly Carter, Chad Rushing, Anna Rushing, Daniel Rushing, and Sophia Rushing, five great-grandchildren: Jack Rushing, Kate Rushing, Maggie Carter, Beth Carter, and Branko Rushing.
He was proceeded in death by his parents, son, Paul E. Rushing, two brothers, Kenneth Rushing and Richard Rushing, and one sister, Bonnie Gasperin.
Curtis served in World War II in the Navy on the USS Franklin Ship CV-13 and survived its bombing. He retired from Fiat-Allis and was an active member of Kumler United Methodist Church.
Private services will be held. Burial will follow at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be made to Kumler Neighborhood Ministries.
CDC Protocol shall be followed.
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To Plant Memorial Trees in memory, please visit our Sympathy Store.Published in The State Journal-Register from Jan. 11 to Jan. 13, 2021